Celia Scott, Robert Maxwell and others
Ideas, Faces and Places: Sweet Disorder and the Carefully Careless

IDEAS ETC COVER
March 2023

Ideas, Faces and Places: Sweet Disorder and the Carefully Careless

Softover Book

£15 (forthcoming March 2023)

Celia Scott, Robert Maxwell, Kenneth Frampton, Irina Davidovich, John Tuomey, Edwards Jones, Eric Parry, Janet Abrams, Patrick Lynch, Adrian Forty, Mark Swenarton, Robin Webster and Anthony Vidler.

Ideas, Faces and Places is a record of an exhibition and symposium that took place in Dublin at The Irish Architectural Archive in the autumn of 2022, “Sweet Disorder and the Carefully Careless: Ideas, Faces and Places”, which transferred to RIBA headquarters in London in the Spring of 2023. The book is a repository for some of the observations that arose at these events made by architects and critics including John Tuomey, Ed Jones, Irina Davidovici, Kenneth Frampton and others. The exhibition juxtaposed Celia Scott’s busts of the architects James Stirling, Leon Krier, Alan Colquhoun, Ed Jones and others, with a pictorial biography of her husband, the eminent architect and academic Robert Maxwell (1922-2020). The view that this book offers of the exhibition and of the work of Scott and Maxwell is provisional and partial, offering the reader the chance to meander and to relish unexpected juxtapositions and oblique views of its subjects - almost exactly like the rooms that Celia Scott created in Dublin and in London.

Ideas, Faces and Places is a record of an exhibition and symposium that took place in Dublin at The Irish Architectural Archive in the autumn of 2022, “Sweet Disorder and the Carefully Careless: Ideas, Faces and Places”, which transferred to RIBA headquarters in London in the Spring of 2023. The book is a repository for some of the observations that arose at these events made by architects and critics including John Tuomey, Ed Jones, Irina Davidovici, Kenneth Frampton and others. The exhibition juxtaposed Celia Scott’s busts of the architects James Stirling, Leon Krier, Alan Colquhoun, Ed Jones and others, with a pictorial biography of her husband, the eminent architect and academic Robert Maxwell (1922-2020). The view that this book offers of the exhibition and of the work of Scott and Maxwell is provisional and partial, offering the reader the chance to meander and to relish unexpected juxtapositions and oblique views of its subjects - almost exactly like the rooms that Celia Scott created in Dublin and in London.

“The exhibition is an important tribute to a group of people who were significant players in British architecture (and beyond) in the latter half of the twentieth century and, perhaps more importantly, to those who have educated and influenced the architects of the first quarter of the twenty-first century.”

Robin Webster, 2022

“They invite a dialogue and an entry into diverse, rich episodes of collective consciousness drawn into focus by Maxwell’s palpable presence—like a narrator of an epic novel see-sawing between object and subject.”

Eric Parry, 2022

“It all began for me at the AA 1959-60 when Bob was our inspiring and extremely kind master for projects. It was the best of times: Bob had a certain George Smiley appearance; he was the consummate chairman, the room fell silent when he spoke. He would find something not uninteresting to say about the most uninteresting project.”

Ed Jones, 2020

“Jim Stirling’s head is actually life-size, but probably looks larger because of the adjacent smaller heads. Alan Colquhoun had a small head, and I think probably Sandy’s head has become smaller than life-size. Just by way of explanation, I count myself a modern artist and the heads are meant to be ironic. I was playing games. They consciously do not show the hand of the artist, in order to show the difference between the sitters. I was using the bust form to reflect an idea about their public persona, so Leo’s head is done in strict 1850s style akin to his own passion for the architecture of that era. Jim was done as a German baron (he was doing a lot of work there and highly thought of in that country at the time), and the curved undercut of the front of the bust reflects the giant cornice at Stuttgart. Alan Colquhoun as Seneca.”

Celia Scott, 2022